Village in Wiltshire…population 511 in 2011

Our field trip day took us out of Oxford into the southwest English countryside. We enjoyed a scenic drive to reach the first stop. The quaint village of Avebury is known for Avebury Henge, a mysterious prehistoric sacred site. It consists of a ditch and bank with circles of stone, constructed between 2600 and 2400 B.C. Exploring a village like Avebury is fascinating to me, especially the architecture, signs and flowers.

What more does an English need?

Well maybe a shop or two!

Brilliant shop marketing…but short on time, tutor is rounding us up!

One of the stones in circle…would love to hear this mystery unraveled.

After short stay in Avebury, we were back on road to Lacock. This quintessential English village has charm galore. It has made appearances in such films as Downton Abbey, BBC’s Pride and Prejudice and Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. We had lunch in a pub established in 1361.

Fish & chips with malt vinegar–of course!

Lacock’s streets are lined with ivy-covered stone cottages and timber-framed buildings.

Now I could live in this charming little abode! Look at the blue and white jardiniere in window!

I wonder what’s behind the wispy white curtains?

Tranquil setting of Lacock Abbey founded in 1232

Lacock Abbey operated from 1232 until 1539 when it shut down from King Henry VIII Dissolution of Monasteries order. It has gone through different changes from a Gothic ruin to the birthplace of photography. William Henry Fox Talbot who lived at Lacock Abbey captured the world’s first photographic negative in 1834. Today it is a country house with monastic roots.

Side view of Lacock Abbey

Medieval tithe barn for storing 1/10 of farm produce for church

Double take….are these eggs really free?!!

Yes, I found an antique shop in Lacock village and Dorset buttons!

I’ll end the field trip with an antique shop photo. After touring Lacock Abbey I had just enough time to backtrack to a little shop in an alley I had spotted earlier. I found Dorset buttons made in the English county of Dorset from 1622-185o. These craft-made buttons were created by binding thread or yarn over a ring. After 1850, machine made buttons took over.

I just never know what treasure I will find behind those antique signs. Oh, the thrill of the hunt! How I love it!

Blessings!

Next travelogue post: The Oxford Experience Closing Banquet